Reflections on writing, publishing, writing craft, and more from our editorial staff.

Considering Historical Fiction At Its Finest Editor's analysis of plot, characterization, and handling of exposition in THE PILLARS OF THE EARTH, by Ken Follett

[by Ross Browne]

If you’ve read any of Ken Follett’s work, it probably comes as no surprise that he was able to turn his own personal fascination with cathedrals and how they’re built into a damn good novel. But from a fiction technique viewpoint, what he done with The Pillars of The Earth transcends good and might be seen […]

By |2022-09-27T17:38:54+00:00|Historical Fiction, RSB, The Writer’s Craft|Comments Off on Considering Historical Fiction At Its Finest Editor's analysis of plot, characterization, and handling of exposition in THE PILLARS OF THE EARTH, by Ken Follett

Flashing The Reader A practical guide to clearly managing transitions of time, place, and viewpoint in fiction

[by John Robert Marlow]

TRICKY TRANSITIONS

Few works of fiction relate events in a continuous flow, from start to finish. Sometimes the story moves back in time (as with flashbacks); more often it jumps forward, sparing the reader the dull details of ordinary life. Frequently, the transition will take the reader from one location (and set of characters) […]

By |2022-09-20T15:48:57+00:00|JRM, The Writer’s Craft|Comments Off on Flashing The Reader A practical guide to clearly managing transitions of time, place, and viewpoint in fiction

Keep it or Cut it? Four questions to help you get your manuscript down to size

[by Whitney Bak]

When an editor takes the literary equivalent of a hedge trimmer to your bountiful, blossoming book baby, the process can feel more than a little personal. While some authors begin working with an editor in the very early stages of developing their manuscript, many don’t solicit editorial help until they’ve produced a […]

By |2022-09-14T16:07:15+00:00|Getting Published, The Writer’s Craft, WB|Comments Off on Keep it or Cut it? Four questions to help you get your manuscript down to size

So Who’s It Written For? Distinguishing the Differences Between Young Adult and Middle Grade

[by Sean Fletcher]

It happens more often than you think. A budding (or seasoned) writer approaches me for an edit on what they believe to be a work of middle grade, only for me to tell them that their 100,000-word fantasy about a 17-year-old discovering their identity among a totalitarian regime would fit better as a young […]

By |2022-02-26T15:37:17+00:00February 18th, 2022|SF|Comments Off on So Who’s It Written For? Distinguishing the Differences Between Young Adult and Middle Grade

Considering Eight Bestselling Series in Crime Fiction What authors can learn from John Sandford, Lee Child, CJ Box, and others about how to cultivate a loyal readership

[by Ross Browne]

One piece of advice authors who write popular fiction often hear is that your odds of landing an agent and a traditional publishing deal can improve considerably when your novel is conceived as (or has the potential to work as) a series. This should come as no surprise to anyone who enjoys settling down […]

By |2022-02-16T17:55:55+00:00|Behind The Bestsellers, Genre, Getting Published, Mystery / Suspense, RSB, The Writer’s Craft, Traditional Publishing|Comments Off on Considering Eight Bestselling Series in Crime Fiction What authors can learn from John Sandford, Lee Child, CJ Box, and others about how to cultivate a loyal readership

Make Your Book a Movie or TV / Streaming Series What Hollywood wants. Why they want it badly. How to maximize your odds of adaptation success.

[by John Robert Marlow]

Humans have always been storytellers. Whether gathered around a campfire, painting on cave walls, or writing words on dead trees or glowing screens—it’s in our blood. Books and other storytelling formats can be noble undertakings, capable of reaching hundreds of thousands and sometimes millions of people. But movies and series are the global […]

By |2022-02-16T18:01:25+00:00|General, JRM, Screenwriting & Screenplay Adaptation|Comments Off on Make Your Book a Movie or TV / Streaming Series What Hollywood wants. Why they want it badly. How to maximize your odds of adaptation success.
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